Wednesday, July 29, 2009

‘Not Your Grandma’s Genealogy’ - Salt Lake Family History Expo Teaches ‘Tech to Trace Your Roots’

This is not your grandma’s genealogy. Family History Expos.com Founder and President Holly T. Hansen says new techniques and technology have turned family history research into a happening industry that attracts fans from nearly every walk of life.

“You just can’t believe what’s happening out there,” Hansen said. “New developments, especially those associated with the Internet, are connecting people all over the world and bringing families together faster than we would have ever imagined.”

Family historians (and those even mildly interested in researching their roots) can learn all about the latest techniques and technology at the Salt Lake City, Utah Family History Expo, Aug. 28 and 29.

The Salt Lake City, Utah Family History Expo will be held at the South Towne Expo Center, 9575 South State Street, Sandy, Utah 84070. Free parking is available at the event venue. The expo will take place Aug. 28 and 29, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. At the door registration begins at 7 a.m. on Friday and 7:30 a.m. on Saturday.

The exhibit hall is open to the public, as is the event’s keynote address. Don R. Anderson, senior vice president of services for FamilySearch will speak.

Paid registrants can sign up for two days chalk-full of classes on research techniques and new technology. FamilySearch is in the process of releasing an updated version. Classes offered will include instruction on using the newest version. Register for classes online at http://www.fhexpos.com.

Other classes offered will include (but are not limited to) “Facebook for Family History,” “Google, a Gold Mine of Genealogy Gems,” “The Chicken Walked Here: Principles & Procedures for Learning to Read Germanic & Scandinavian Gothic Script,” and more.

The expo will also feature Family History Expos.com’s newest addition to the events it holds throughout the Western United States called the Twitter Café and Blogger Bistro. Here participants can learn fun and exciting ways to get connected and stay connected with family members and friends. Hansen said social Internet networking is becoming more and more popular among researchers.

Register online today at http://www.fhexpos.com.

Mark Your Calendars - UVPAFUG Meeting!

UTAH VALLEY PAF USERS GROUP MEETING

The next regular, second-Saturday-of-the-month meeting of the Utah Valley PAF (Personal Ancestral File) Users Group will be on Saturday, 8 Aug 2009, from 9 am until noon in the Edgewood/Riverside LDS Chapel, 3511 North 180 East, Provo, Utah. The chapel is in the Provo "River Bottoms" behind the Jamestown shopping plaza on the east side of University Avenue. You get to it by turning east from University Avenue at 3700 North ("Will's Pit Stop") and then south on 180 East. There is a map showing the location on the group's website http://uvpafug.org .

The main presentation for this meeting will be by Mary E. V. Hill on USING A DIGITAL CAMERA IN GENEALOGY. She will discuss how to use a digital camera for many things in genealogy, for example, copying records in libraries and archives and photographing tombstones and other items. Mary E. Vassel Hill was born in Norwalk, Connecticut and obtained a BA in Family and Community History and an Master of Library Science from Brigham Young University. She was a Reference Librarian at BYU (1989-1992), Instructor in Family History and genealogical research at BYU (1992-1995), and joined the staff of the Family History Library in Salt Lake City as a cataloger in Spanish and Portuguese (1995-1998). In 1998 Mary joined the US/Canada reference staff and was an instructor in various aspects of genealogical research. She served as an LDS Missionary at the Family History Library (2006-2008). She is an accredited genealogist in Eastern and Southern states research, and is a sought after speaker at genealogy fairs and conferences. The workshop she developed on setting up a paper filing system in this day of the computer has been particularly popular. She is also a mother and grandmother and author of several genealogy books. Her website is http://www.maryevhill.com .

Following the main presentation there will be several classes taught concerning technology and family history. As usual, there will be something for everyone at all levels of expertise. The classes currently scheduled for this meeting are the following:

  1. Clearing Names for the Temple in 2009, by Duane Dudley
  2. How to Teach New Family Search to Members, by Laurie Castillo
  3. Google for Family History, by Susan Maxwell
  4. Using the MAC Computer in FH, (TBA)
  5. Q&A on Using Digital Cameras, by Mary Hill
  6. Video of last month's main presentation by Lance MacIntosh on Family History Support
  7. Ancestral Quest, by Gaylon Findlay
  8. Legacy, by Joel Graham
  9. RootsMagic, by Bruce Buzbee.
All meetings of the Users Group are open to the public whether members of the Group or not. The Users Group has the goal of helping individuals use technology to further their family history and there are usually 100-125 attending the monthly meetings on the second Saturdays. The officers are Gerhard Ruf, President; Don Snow and Brian Cooper, VP's; Beth Ann Wiseman, PAFology Editor; Kay Baker and Gerry Eliason working with finances and membership; and Bruce Merrill, Lynne Shumway, and Marie Andersen, working with the DVD Library. Several of these will be there to help with membership, answer questions, distribute the current issue of the monthly newsletter PAFology, and check out DVD's of past presentations and classes to members of the group. Information about the Users Group, main presentations, classes, and class notes are available on the Group's website http://uvpafug.org and the press releases are online at http://blog.uvpafug.org/. For further information contact President Gerhard Ruf at pres@uvpafug.org (801-225-6106), VP1 Don Snow at snowd@math.byu.edu, or VP2 Brian Cooper at vp2@uvpafug.org.

BYU conference - win a free computer from Legacy Family Tree

The following is from Legacy Family Tree

Here's a little extra incentive to stop by the Legacy Family Tree booth at the BYU conference next week (begins Tuesday, July 28 in Provo, Utah). We're giving away a free Acer Netbook PC. And if you're not in the area, we've got a special "50% off" deal for you below.

You do not have to register for the conference to be eligible to win the computer. But you do have to turn in the entry form (it's a crossword puzzle) to the Legacy booth by 4:00pm on Thursday and be present for the drawing. The drawing will be held at the end of our "Legacy & New FamilySearch" class which begins at 5:15pm in room 2258. The class is free and is open to the public.

Meet the Legacy developers
Legacy's Geoff Rasmussen (that's me) as well as Legacy's co-founder, Ken McGinnis, will be at the conference - so bring your questions and suggestions - we look forward to talking with you.

Download the entry form
All the contest rules (like you must be present to win, etc.) are explained on the entry form. Click here to download the form, or you can pick one up from the Legacy booth starting Tuesday morning. If you can't make it to the conference, download the form anyways - it's a fun crossword puzzle!

Is this a real computer?
It is so real, that I personally use an identical Acer Netbook for all of my presentations throughout the world. In fact, the Legacy seminar that we recently published online was recorded using this Acer Netbook. Actually, that's not all the way correct. The netbook we're giving away has a 10.1 inch screen. Mine is only 8.9 inches. It's got a "roomy" hard drive (160GB), and the 1GB of memory is enough to run its operating system (Windows XP). It also has a digital media card reader, built-in webcam, built-in stereo speakers, 3 USB ports, and built-in wireless so you can surf the Internet. Yes, it's a real computer and a real contest. Dick Eastman, our 2007 Legacy Genealogy Cruise speaker and editor of Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter, recently wrote about how great these netbooks are. DearMYTLE, our 2008 Legacy Genealogy Cruise speaker also wrote about netbooks here.

If you can't make it to the conference...
...we've got something special for you too. Purchase any Legacy Family Tree product (Legacy software, manuals, training videos) at 50% off. Already have Legacy? This is a great chance to get Legacy for a friend or family member. This special promotion ends on the last day of this BYU conference (July 31, 2009). Just use the following coupon code at checkout:

conference

So, why are we doing this again?
Mostly for fun. But mainly we want as many people as possible to come see our "Legacy & New FamilySearch" class Thursday evening. We will not be announcing that our new FamilySearch interaction tools are now available to download (the crossword puzzle tells you when it will be released), but we will show you what the new software looks like and how close we are to its official certification.

Hope to see you all there!

Tuesday, July 28, 2009

Where Have I Been?

My blogging status of late has been absent. I just got back from a 16 day trip back east. The primary purpose was to attend a Harris family reunion in Glens Falls, New York. All my siblings were going to be there and we were going to honor my father's 75th birthday at the reunion. My husband Bill and I were the only ones in my immediate family attending. My kids needed to scrap up the money to come but none of them quit got there. I am actually glad it was just my husband and I that went because the car would of been too crowded otherwise.

Yes, we drove about 7,000 plus miles all together on this trip. That is a lot of time in the car. I am so grateful for air conditioning :) Since we were making the trip by car we decided to stop at LDS historical places along the way. It was the first time I ever went to Winter Quarters in Nebraska. We could feel spirits following us in the cemetery. It was way cool and brought tears to your eyes too. My husband said it felt like Gettysburg's battle fields when he visited there.

We stayed several days in Nauvoo and just didn't want to leave. It is a beautiful, peaceful place. We enjoyed wagon rides, plays and pageants. We visited the restored shops and homes. We looked in the antique shops in town. Our first and last place to visit in Nauvoo was the temple. When we were there last in 1991 there was no Nauvoo temple and no plans for it to be rebuilt either. It was wonderful to see it majestically sitting a top the hill for all to see. As I looked at the statues of Joseph and Hyram longingly leaving Nauvoo before the martyrdom I could understand a part of how they felt.


In Kirtland, Ohio I did the first of my genealogy research. I wanted to find the graves of Murray and Grace (Harris) Jenkins. They joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in 1830 and came to Kirtland and never left. I found this couple while doing a Google search of Harrisena, the community I grew up in and am somehow related to all that lived there. I knew how I was related to Murray Jenkins but not Grace Harris. Her obituary tells of how her family in Harrisena offered her lands if she would disown the church, which she never did. They must of disowned her because I cannot find out how she is related to my Harris' but I know that she is. I didn't discover anything further while in Kirtland. I have to send away to the state for her death certificate because the town didn't have it.

With the help of the LDS visitor center I found the location of the cemetery and how to get to it. We easily drove there. When we stopped the car I got out and walked a distance right to the grave. I just knew where it was but I had never been there before. Tears came to both mine and my husbands eyes as we read their tombstone. I could just feel this longing for them to be connected back to the family. I was the first Harris relative to visit Grace's grave since the family had disowned her. It was very touching. My husband was all choked up and I said to him "Your not a used to it as I am." It was great that he could feel the spirit and importance of my doing genealogy work while on this trip. He was a great support to me in my efforts. He took the vast majority of 1,800 plus photographs we took while on this trip.

After Kirtland we stopped in Palymra, New York for the Hill Cumorah pageant. It has greatly changed since we last saw it. Much more professionally and technically done. I haven't decided if I like it better or not. It was still very good. Since we were there last the Palymra temple has been built. The roads have changed. They have also rebuilt the Smith log home and added the ability to walk through the sacred grove from the back of the log home. The path is much longer. I was to tired to walk the whole distance. I just love visiting this area.

Finally I arrived in New York. My dad took my husband and I around to the different cemeteries and homes so I could take pictures. At my first cemetery, the Harrisena or John J. Harris Memorial Cemetery I found that the church there was preparing for a benefit sale. We got to look around and I found this spice rack with all these empty clean bottles with stoppers in them. The idea popped in my head that they were perfect for me to take little samples of the dirt from each of the cemteries and homes that I visited. I was so excited about doing this. I bought the bottles and did just that. I was able to bring home a little piece of my heritage. It is one of my most treasured items from the whole trip.

The weather was perfect for taking pictures in the cemeteries. It was cloudy and the tombstones look like they came out clear. It was wonderful to finally get pictures of generations of ancestors tombstones. (The picture shows my 4th great-grandfather's tombstone, one of the oldest and most difficult to read.) The Seeyle cemetery brought back so many memories of my childhood spent sitting among those stones wondering how I was related to the individuals there. This time I really knew them because I have my ancestry etched in my mind.

The family reunion came next. It was a wonderfully successful event. First we where going to have the reunion for all the descendants of Marshall and Sarah (Miller) Harris, my grandparents. Then it grew to the descendants of the great-grandparents Leroy and Alice (Osberg) Harris. By the time it made the local papers it was all the descendants of my 5th great-grand father Moses Harris, Jr. the Revolutionary War spy. No one got a good count as to how many showed up. (The picture shows my generation of cousins - no spouses. I can already tell we are missing some that were there.)

We were out doors at a park in a covered pavillon. I was so happy to find I had a power outlit for my laptop. I was able to pin up my wall chart for everyone to look at and set up shop to take down family history information. I was busy the whole reunion. I only got something to eat because my brother brought it over to me. I was so tickled that so many expressed their thanks that I was keeping records of the family. I sent my husband around to take pictures for me. Thank goodness for name tags! It was a long beautiful day. I so needed to be there and was grateful that I could make it.

The days after the reunion I did genealogy research with my faithful husband by my side. I was even able to attend the Northeastern New York Genealogical Society meeting. The Crandall Library in New York has a wonderful genealogy room. I could spend my lifetime in there and still not gather all the genealogy information I want or needed from it. It was kind of sad that I only had five days to do all my research.

I spent two days in Greenwich, New York to work on my mother's side of the family. My Aunt Florence is the only surviving sibling of my mother's 13 brothers and sisters. It was great to see her. She had just gathered a bunch of photographs from a distance relative. We identified who everyone was and my husband took digital photographs of them all. (The picture shows my great-grandmother Hattie Hewitt Weatherwax and her daughter Hattie) Then we visited the cemetery where many ancestors are buried and we were able to take photographs. It was raining but the pictures appear to have come out well. Once again I took my dirt sample and have a piece of my ancestors with me.

My second day in Greenwich I visited the town clerk and got several copies of death certificates. Unfortunately most have parents unknown, at least that is what the clerk told me. I have yet to go over all of them. The clerks are very organized there I was impressed. After getting the death certificates she went through her database she had just finished creating and told me exactly where all these people are buried. I think she was impressed to build that database and have it finished just because I was coming on the scene. One sad thing to note is that all the town records burned in 1910 so I wasn't able to go to far back in the records, only up to 1880 and those were recovered from the state. With this database the clerk had created it cross references all the transcribed cemeteries in the area so I could find out all the Weatherwax's and other family names in the area.

The Gill room in the Greenwich Library was another spot I could of spent days in. Of course right before leaving I found the one reference book I could of spent days on. I took down what I could from the index and hopefully I can get the rest of the information later. At least I have clues.

My days of research sadly ended and we hurried back to Utah in a marathon 3 day trip. We arrived home at 1:00 am EST Monday morning, which was 11:00 p.m. MST Sunday night. I got to bed at 1:00 am and then had to get up at 6:30 am Monday morning to get ready for work. It has been a marthon trip with much done, visited and seen. I had no naps while I was gone and my health stood up to the pace. Now that I am home I am trying to recover from the trip.

Right before leaving on the trip I had bought some Chinese food and a bunch of fortune cookies. I chuckled as all my fortunes referred to my trip. My last one said "You will be traveling and coming into a fortune." Now true it was. I did come back with a fortune in genealogy materials. I also had good fortune all along the way. Great parking spots, last room at the motels, in fact my husband and I joked all the along the way on my great fortune. I truely have been blessed.

Thankfully my sons didn't burn down the house while I was gone. The only mishap while away was that my oldest son decided to clean and he started with the freezer. He threw away everything past it's expiration date. I could of cried. He didn't realize that the expiration date was if the meat was still fresh and not frozen. The freezer is pretty much empty now, my my how much room there is.

Now that I am home and starting to work on reading my emails and catching up on blog posts I am sure you will see a lot of posts from me regarding what I missed while away. The really big job now is compiling all the new information I have found. This will keep me busy for a long, long time.

See ya tomorrow, for tomorrow is always another genealogy day!

Saturday, July 11, 2009

RootsMagic 4 Receives FamilySearch Helper Certification

RootsMagic becomes First Desktop Genealogy Software to Allow Helper Access to New FamilySearch

SPRINGVILLE, Utah. — July 9, 2009 — RootsMagic, Inc. announced the immediate availability of an update to their RootsMagic 4 genealogy software which is now FamilySearch "Helper" certified. RootsMagic 4 is the first- and currently the only- desktop genealogy software to offer this feature and certification.

Helper Certified

As a "Helper Certified" application, RootsMagic 4 allows members of the LDS Church who have access to New FamilySearch to log into a special "helper mode" for another member who does not yet have access to the system. This allows the member being helped to view, update, and synchronize their data with New FamilySearch as well as check, reserve, and request temple ordinances- even if they personally do not have an account on New FamilySearch. All that is required is their name, birthdate, and the last five digits of the LDS Church membership number.

Assisting the New FamilySearch Roll-out to Utah and Idaho

Temple districts in Utah and Idaho are among the last to transition over to the New FamilySearch system. To prevent duplication of temple work, members in these areas who do not have access to New FamilySearch are instructed to meet with a family history consultant or visit a family history center and search the New FamilySearch system to determine whether or not temple ordinances have already been performed for deceased ancestors. RootsMagic makes it easy for the family history consultants and family history centers to accomplish this:
  1. Import the member's data into RootsMagic. RootsMagic can directly import data from PAF, Family Tree Maker (through 2006), Family Origins, Legacy Family Tree, and GEDCOM.
  2. Sign in as a helper for the member.
  3. Search duplicate ancestor records to ensure temple ordinances are needed.
  4. Select the ordinances for each ancestor needing temple work and reserve them.
  5. Print the Family Ordinance Request to be taken to the temple.
RootsMagic is also the only desktop genealogy software currently certified to reserve temple ordinances and print the Family Ordinance Request.
New FamilySearch Made Easy
"We're very excited to be the first software to offer the 'helper' ability," said Michael Booth, vice-president. "As a Utah-based company, we've been patiently waiting for New FamilySearch to be available to our friends and neighbors. While many still don't have direct access to New FamilySearch, the helper ability is the next-best thing." Bruce Buzbee, president, said, "Our mission is, 'Family History Made Easy', and that is exactly what this is. To submit and track temple ordinances used to be a long, complicated process involving many files and floppy disks. Together with FamilySearch, we've been able to simplify it to a few clicks and a single, printed page."

RootsMagic also simplifies other tasks when working with New FamilySearch. Recently, RootsMagic 4 received awards for "Easiest to Sync" and "Best Dashboard" at the 2009 FamilySearch Developer Awards. Video tutorials, demonstrating how easy it is to work with New FamilySearch using RootsMagic 4 are available at http://www.rootsmagic.com/fs.

Free Trial Available

A free trial version of RootsMagic 4 is available at http://www.rootsmagic.com. The trial version allows a person to import their data, add information, and play with RootsMagic's major features without any time limitation. "We're so excited about this new release, we wanted to give everyone a risk-free option to try it for themselves," said Buzbee.

Users of other genealogy software products will find it easy to experiment with RootsMagic 4 using their own data. RootsMagic can directly import data from PAF, Family Tree Maker (through 2006), Family Origins, and Legacy Family Tree. It can also read data using the popular GEDCOM format.

About RootsMagic, Inc.

For over 20 years, RootsMagic, Inc. has been creating computer software with a special purpose- to unite families. One of our earliest products- the popular "Family Origins" software, introduced thousands of people to the joy and excitement of family history.

That tradition continues today with "RootsMagic", our award-winning genealogy software which makes researching, organizing, and sharing your family history fun and easy. "Personal Historian" will help you easily write and preserve your life stories. "Family Reunion Organizer" takes the headaches out of planning those important get-togethers. And "Family Atlas" creates beautiful and educational geographic maps of your family history.

For more information, visit http://www.rootsmagic.com.

Source: RootsMagic, Inc.

Wednesday, July 01, 2009

Miles Meyers' Family History Center Materials

It's been a while since I've mentioned Miles Meyers excellent job he is doing on creating Family History Center materials on his website. I just spotted this email that he posted on the FHCNET and LDSFHCConsultants Mailing lists and I thought I would pass it along. As always Miles has done and excellent job, keep up the good work.
FamilySearch.org power point presentations available.

I have recently been asked to do some presentations on FamilySearch.org. The first one was earlier this month to an Elder's Quorum fireside. The next one is coming up on July 11 and will be to the Southern Genealogical Exchange Society meeting.

The first presentation focuses on some of the scriptural reasons why we do family history as well as focusing on the materials that are being provided by FamilySearch on its various websites.

The second presentation is for the general public, explaining what FamilySearch is developing and what is currently available.

Both of these presentations are about 45 minutes in length and are in powerpoint format. They can be found at http://milesmeyer.googlepages.com/additionalfhcmaterials

Also, I just did a talk in Sacrament yesterday and have provided a copy of my talk on Independence Day and Family History on my blog for anyone who may be interested. That can be found at http://milesgenealogy.blogspot.com/

Hope these are inspirational to my fellow FHC consultants.

Miles Meyer
Jacksonville, FL

New FamilySearch update - 01 July 2009

Last night I was talking to my brother Randy, who happens to be a member of the stake presidency in Provo. He told me he had just tried to get on new FamilySearch and it let him register. I had not heard anything official regarding Provo family history consultants and priesthood leaders getting access, but I wasn't surprised either.

I looked on the New.FamilySearch.org Utah and Idaho Release - news and information page and found that all of the Utah/Idaho temple districts have at least some level of access. Below is a copy of what has been announced.

News and Updates

All members in the following temple districts have full access to the Web site:

  • Twin Falls Idaho
  • Monticello Utah
  • Rexburg Idaho
  • Manti Utah
  • Vernal Utah
  • Logan Utah

Family history leaders in the following temple districts have been sent the preparation notification. Click on the temple name to see the announced release date for each stake in the temple district.

Consultants in the following Utah and Idaho temple districts have been sent instructions to begin viewing the online training modules listed on the Prepare tab. These consultants may also begin using the new.familysearch.org Web site.

  • St. George Utah
  • Mount Timpanogos Utah
  • Bountiful Utah
  • Salt Lake Utah
  • Ogden Utah
  • Draper Utah
  • Idaho Falls Idaho
  • Jordan River Utah
  • Provo Utah
I have updated my New FamilySearch Roll-out spreadsheet to reflect these changes.

See ya tomorrow, for tomorrow is always another genealogy day!

FamilySearch Indexing Update: Czech Republic, South Africa, Mexico, and Deutschland Projects Added

Indexers waiting for projects from the Czech Republic, Baden, Germany, or South Africa can now get busy. New indexing projects added this week are:

· Czech Republic, Litomerice Kirchenbücher, 1552–1905 [Part 1]

· Deutschland, Baden—Kirchenbücher, 1810-1869

· Mexico DF Registros Parroquiales, 1886–1933 [Part 1]

· South Africa, Cape Province Dutch Reformed Church, 1660–1970

· U.S., Illinois, Cook County Birth Certificates, 1916–1922 [Part 2]

· U.S., Massachusetts Marriages, 1896–1897

· U.S., Minnesota 1885 State Census

(See the chart below for a complete list and current status of all indexing projects).

Recently Completed Projects

(Note: Recently completed projects have been removed from the available online indexing batches and will now go through a final completion check process in preparation for future publication.)

· Mexico, Censo de 1930—Tamaulipas

· South Carolina—1920 U.S. Federal Census

· Utah—1920 U.S. Federal Census

Current FamilySearch Indexing Projects, Record Language, and Percent Completion

Argentina, Buenos Aires 1855 Census

Spanish

44%

Argentina Censo 1869—Jujuy Salta Tucuman

Spanish

46%

Argentina Censo 1869—Santiago y Santa Fe

Spanish

12%

Australia, Greenwich—Genealogical Records, 1776–1980

English

65%

Austria, Wiener Meldezettel, 1890–1925

German

1%

Belgium, Antwerp Foreigners Index, 1840–1930

Dutch, Flemish

41%

Czech Republic, Litomerice Kirchenbücher, 1552–1905 [Part 1]

German

(New)

France Registres Protestants, 1612–1906 [Part 1]

French

81%

France Registres Protestants, 1612–1906 [Part 2]

French

2%

France, Coutances, Paroisses de la Manche, 1792–1906

French

89%

France, Paroisses de Cherbourg, 1802–1907

French

1%

France, Paroisses de Coutances, 1802–1907

French

1%

France, Paroisses de Saint-Lo, 1802–1907

French

2%

Germany, Baden—Kirchenbücher, 1810-1869

German

(New)

Germany, Brandenburg Kirchenbücher, 1789–1875

German

65%*

Germany, Mecklenburg 1890 Volkszählung, Div 24–38

German

45%

Italy, Trento Baptism Records, 1784–1924

Italian

87%

Jamaica, Trelawny Births, 1878–1930

English

25%

Mexico, Censo de 1930Mexico

Spanish

10%

Mexico, Censo de 1930Yucatan

Spanish

35%

Mexico DF Registros Parroquiales, 1886–1933 [Part 1]

Spanish

(New)

Nicaragua, Managua Civil Records, 1879–Present

Spanish

55%*

Peru, LimaRegistros Civiles, 1910–1930

Spanish

34%

Russia, St Petersburg Kirchenbuchduplikat, 1833–1885

German

1%

South Africa, Cape Province Dutch Reformed Church, 1660–1970

English

(New)

Spain, Avila, Moraleja de Matacabras, 15401904

Spanish

46%

Spain, LugoRegistros Parroquiales [Part 1], 15301930

Spanish

19%

U.K., Cheshire Parish Records [Part 2], 1538-1850

English

15%

U.K., Warwickshire Parish Registers, 1538–Present

English

2%

U.S., Arkansas County Marriages VI, 1837–1957

English

51%

U.S., Illinois, Cook County Birth Certificates, 1916–1922 [Part 2]

English

(New)

U.S., Indiana, Adams County Marriages, 1811–1959

English

50%

U.S., Indiana, Allen County Marriages, 1811–1959

English

16%

U.S., Indiana, Blackford County Marriages 1811–1959

English

90%

U.S., Massachusetts Marriages, 1896–1897

English

(New)

U.S., Minnesota 1885 State Census

English

(New)

U.S., New York 1905 State Census

English

48%

U.S., Pennsylvania—1920 U.S. Federal Census

English

35%

U.S., Washington—County Marriages, 1858–1950

English

(New)

Ukraine, Kyiv, 1840–1842

Russian

21%

Venezuela, Mérida Registros Parroquiales. 1654–1992

Spanish

25%

(*Percentage refers to a specific portion of a larger project.)

Current FamilySearch Partner Projects, Record Language, and Percent Completion

BelgiqueRegistres Des DécèsCharleroi, 1851–1900

French

39%

Belgique—Registres Des Décès—En Français, 17961910

French

22%*

BelgiëOverlijdens RegistersIn het Nederlands, 1796–1910

Dutch, Flemish

91%*

BelgiëOverlijdens RegistersKalmthout, 1851–1900

Dutch, Flemish

92%

BelgiëOverlijdens RegistersMechelen, 1851–1900

Dutch, Flemish

9%

Deutschland, Bremer Schifflisten, 1904–1914

German

59%

Flanders Death Registration, 1796–1900

French, Dutch, Flemish

79%*

Norway 1875 Census [Part 1]

Norwegian

40%

Canada, Nova Scotia—Antigonish Church Records, 1823–1905

English

87%

U.S., Arkansas Marriages IV, 1837–1957

English

38%

U.S., Indiana Marriages, 1882 to April 1905

English

93%

U.S., Ohio Tax Records2 of 4, Post 1825

English

78%

U.S., Ohio Tax Records3 of 4, Post 1825

English

1%

U.S., Vermont Militia Records, 1861–1867

English

45%

(*Percentage refers to a specific portion of a larger project.)

Current FamilySearch Regional Projects, Record Language, and Percent Completion

(These projects are being indexed by volunteers in specific areas of the world.)




Australia, NSW—Bounty Immigrants, 1824–1842

English

8%

Australia, Sydney Cemetery Inscriptions, 1800–1960

English

9%

Australia, Victoria Probate Records, 18531989

English

66%

Canada, British Columbia Marriages, 1859–1932

English

9%

Canada, Quebec—Trois-Rivières IC, 18001900

French

54%